Polk Audio RTi A7 Review – Speaker Obession

RTi A7 Image

My research for speakers a level above kept revolving around these RTi A7s.   When I looked at them in the shop they were a perfect color and contour match.  I got a sense of accomplishment when I realized that my speaker search had come to an end.  I love stereo listening and these speakers are built around that.  I was originally thoroughly impressed with the A9s’ but realized that they were really tall for my place and also required a lot of power.  The A7s were more of a match and now I realize that its more than that.

Sound reproduction is incredible.  Even the slightest of sounds are made crystal clear from the speakers.   I did not like the addition of  a subwoofer for stereo listening as it interfered with the clarity.   I use a Denon AVR 3310CI to drive these speakers and they have produced excellent results.  I use it for a lot of low volume listening that I’ve found to appreciate.  And when it comes to high volume, they can go as high as you can take.   Adding an amp would definitely benefit, but there’s nothing wrong without one.

HD Audio, Blu ray discs and audio CDs bring out the best in this speaker.  They discriminate a bit if you’re using compressed audio however high the bit rate may be.  The Restorer function in the AVR 3310 seemed to help a little bit with that.   Addition of a sub woofer definitely takes it to a different level, but I had to increase the volume/channel level to match it with the speakers performance.  The A7s go as low as 30Hz but I set the crossover to 100Hz for excellent bass delivery.  Needless to say, without  a subwoofer the bass is very tight and just enough.   Lovely when you’re reading a book and listening to concert hall music.

I still have to bi-amp them with the AVR to see if the results are any different although I’ve read at places that they dont make a big difference.  The binding posts are excellent and the speaker construction is truly extraordinary.  A simple tap and placing a ear on the walls of the speaker reveals excellent resonance built into the cabinet.  Oh yes, the cabinet,  that is a thing of beauty that matched with my wooden flooring.  It is well constructed and no cheap materials in this speaker unit.   Removing the front panel cover reveals a view of professionalism.  Silk dome tweeters,  polymer mid range and 2 woofers give this speaker quite a look when contrasted with a darker shade of silver.   Venting ports are supplied in the front and back.   With a power range of upto 300W you cannot go wrong for home usage.   Watching movies was a true delight when I had all the lights off.  The sound orientation was brilliant when I couldnt exactly realize where it was coming from.

These speakers are no way in my budget but I realized that the value for money is truly a ratio worth passing of without consideration.  And I was glad when I was right this time.   I really appreciate the engineers at Polk who have come out with such a precise speaker.   You guys made it a part of my second life.

Integrating PaperClip Gem to a Rails Model

Include the gem in ‘Gemfile’

gem "paperclip", "~> 3.0"

1.  Add a rails migration to the model

      rails g migration addAvatarColumnToMenu
      invoke  active_record
      create db/migrate/20131113072946_add_avatar_column_to_menu.rb

2.  Edit your migration

 class AddAvatarColumnToMenu < ActiveRecord::Migration
   def self.up
     change_table :menus do |t|
        t.attachment :avatar
     end
   end
   def self.down
      drop_attached_file :menus, :avatar
   end
 end

3.  Add the following to your model

class Menu < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_attached_file :avatar, :styles => { :medium => "300x300>", :thumb => "100x100>" }, :default_url => "/images/:style/missing.png"
end

4.  Run the migration

 rake db:migrate
==  AddAvatarColumnToMenu: migrating ============================
-- change_table(:menus)
-> 0.5326s
==  AddAvatarColumnToMenu: migrated (0.5328s) ===================

5.  You should see the 4 columns added if you run “rails console”

avatar_file_name: string, avatar_content_type: string, avatar_file_size: integer, avatar_updated_at: datetime

6.  Add this to your “new” and “update” views

<%= form_for @menu, :url => menus_path, :html => { :multipart => true } do |form| %>
  <%= form.file_field :avatar %>
<% end %>

7.  Add this to the ‘show’ view

<%= image_tag @menu.avatar.url %>
<%= image_tag @menu.avatar.url(:medium) %>
<%= image_tag @menu.avatar.url(:thumb) %>

8.  Restart the server to get the new table data set.